Configured Navigation Configuration

Overview

Configured Navigation Bars allow you to decide the category names & hierarchy in the main navigation bar of your branded Aunt Bertha site. Configured Navigation is intended to guide users into a more focused experience, so they are not overwhelmed with where to start, which can be the experience of having too many categories to choose from.

  • This includes adding, removing, and reordering items in the top-level navbar and 2nd level categories (by design, Configured Navigation sites do not display 3rd & 4th level tags)

  • You can also choose which icons appear in the top-level navbar using the options in the appendix.

Screen_Shot_2018-06-26_at_5.54.48_PM.png
Standard Navigation

Screen_Shot_2018-06-26_at_5.56.09_PM.png

How it Works

A Configured Navigation is a navigation bar of pre-configured searches that follow the main criteria described in the bullets below.

With a Configured Navigation, Customers can change the category names & groupings to reflect the areas your organization is focused on. The top navigation menu can list up to 10 categories (our default starts with “Food, Housing, Goods”, etc). Each category item can have up to 9 subcategories beneath that are mapped to relevant tags, or keywords. See the Open Eligibility page for the full Aunt Bertha taxonomy.

 

Subcategory Mappings

  • Service Tags - Generally, service tags describe the kind of services the program provides. When considering how to map subcategories in the dropdown, you’ll want to find a service tag that best describes the subcategory. While the words on the dropdowns can be changed, the drop down must map to at least one of our existing service tags.

    • Example: Subcategory name “Dental” mapped to service tag “dental care”

  • Situation (or Attribute) Tags - Generally, situation tags describe the kind of person a program serves (a “Who” tag). When you want to really focus in on a category, you can combine service tags + situation tags to get more honed results. In some cases, however, you might want to display all the types of services available to a specific population.

    • Example: Subcategory name “Cancer Support Groups” mapped to service tag “support groups” + situation tag “cancer”

    • Example: Subcategory name is “Crisis Services” and mapped to situation tag “in crisis”

  • Keyword - While it’s not recommended, you can map to specific keywords. Keywords would need to appear in the mapping exactly as it is in the program card.

    • Example: Subcategory name “Senior Centers” mapped to keyword “senior center”

You cannot combine service tags and keyword searches in the same mapping.

  • Link - You may also direct link to a specific URL, perhaps to a specific program.

Sometimes Customers link to favorite folders, however we do not recommend that as it takes them out of the main search experience.

 

Category Icons

You may choose from the icons below for any of your top-level categories.

unnamed__11_.png

Best Practices

Using Actual Tags for Category Mappings

Configured Navigation works best when we can map to existing tags from the Aunt Bertha taxonomy. If Customer Name is focused on specific populations for which Aunt Bertha has existing situation tags, we can combine existing service tags + existing situation tags to (potentially) get more personalized exact matches.

Examples:

  • Service Tag + Situation Tag(s)

    • Subcategory name “Young Adult Housing”

      • Service tag “Help pay for housing” ; AND

      • Situation tag “teens” OR “young adults”

  • Situation Tag

    • Subcategory name “Veterans Assistance"

      • Situation tag “veterans”

  • Service Tag + Service Tag

    • Subcategory name “Interview & Resume Development"

      • Service tag “interview training” OR

      • Service tag “resume development”

 

Test Your Mappings to see if they will Produce Good Results

You can test most of this functionality just by going to the public Find Help site now and making the appropriate search.  Here are some examples:

  • Service Tag + Situation Tag(s) - Example: “help pay for housing” + “teens”, “young adults”
    • Select the service tag from the existing category dropdown bar or use the Search box Type-Ahead dropdown

    • If you see the checkbox for the situation in which you are interested listed in the Personal Filters section, it means that there are programs for that situation

      • Note: If you do not see that filter option, it means we do not currently have programs for this situation and so it would be best not to filter by it

    • Select the relevant personal filter (situation tag) and see how many results show upSelect the relevant personal filter (situation tag) and see how many results show upTest this for a few different zip code

    • If results are good, this is a good mapping to suggest

    • If results are not great, consider removing the filter so users do not get zero results

  • Situation Tag - Example:  “veterans”
    • Start typing “vete…” in the search box 
    • Select the dropdown from beneath the search box with the tag icon for the word “veterans
    • If results are good, this is a good mapping to suggest
  • Service Tag + Service Tag - Example “interview training” + “resume development”
    • Select the service tag from the existing category dropdown bar or the Search box Type-Ahead dropdown
      • Note the number of search results
    • Select the other service tag from the existing category dropdown bar or the Search box Type-Ahead dropdown
      • Note the number of search results (repeat for 3 or more combinations)
    • Combining the numbers of results for each will give you an idea of how many results are available for each category and whether it’s good to combine it 
    • Test this for a few different zip codes
    • If results are good, this is a good mapping to suggest (keep in mind that some listings might have both tags, in some combination searches

Download the Template

Was this article helpful?
0 out of 0 found this helpful